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Striking steelworkers pose for group shot at Mineral Pigment in Beltsville, MD 1973. Note copy of Washington Area Spark in foreground.

Striking steelworkers pose for group shot at Mineral Pigment in Beltsville, MD 1973. Note copy of Washington Area Spark in foreground.

DC area history doesn’t get old, it’s archived right here on the Washington Area Spark site.

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Blog Post Finding Guide

(our Flickr photo finding guide follows the blog finding guide)

Anarchism and Syndicalism

No posts at this time

Antiwar

(See Vietnam War for Indochina conflict)

Unbowed and unbroken Debs comes to Washington: 1921 [January 10, 2016 by JW] A brief description of Socialist Eugene Debs Washington, D.C. visit following his release from prison for opposing World War I.

Civil Rights and Black Liberation Before 1955

DC’s fighting barber and the end of public school segregation [August 20, 2015 by Daniel Hardin]: A look at Gardner Bishop and the Consolidated Parents group that ended legal segregation of schools in the District of Columbia through boycotts picketing and a legal strategy separate from Brown v. Board of Education.

Shootings by DC police spark fight against brutality, 1936-41 [April 20, 2013 by Craig Simpson]: An account of an early civil rights struggle in Washington, D.C. that united the African American community from the NAACP to the Communist Party and implemented many of the tactics that are still used today.

DC’s old Jim Crow rocked by 1939 Marian Anderson concert [March 14, 2013 by Craig Simpson]: A view of the celebrated struggle against the Jim Crow Daughters of the American Revolution Constitution Hall from the viewpoint of activists. It’s a different one than often told where First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt and Interior Secretary Harold Ickes save the day.

“Scottsboro Boys” – New tactics and strategy for civil rights [February 19, 2013 by Craig Simpson]: The campaign around the “Scottsboro Boys” – nine African American youths accused of raping two Alabama white women—marked the beginning of the civil rights movement out of the churches and into the streets. This account of activities in Washington, D.C. outlines civil disobedience, marches and petition campaigns involving broad coalitions that saved the lives of the nine young men.

Before 1963: The 1922 silent march on Washington [February 6, 2013 by Craig Simpson]: A brief history of the first major African American march on Washington that was held to call for a federal anti-lynching law.

600 black women stand strong: the 1938 crab pickers strike [December 5, 2012 by Craig Simpson]: The amazing struggle of 600 black women led by a communist organizer to improve their conditions and win a union on Maryland’s Jim Crow Eastern Shore. The account is followed by a description of an amazing set of photographs of Crisfield during that time and an account of the communist CIO organizer Michael Howard.

The fight against Capital Transit’s Jim Crow hiring: 1941-55 [October 14, 2012 by Craig Simpson]: The long struggle to integrate Washington’s Capital Transit Company operator ranks—from World War II to the early years of the modern civil rights movement.

A DC labor and civil rights leader remembered: Marie Richardson [November 19, 2012 by Craig Simpson]: Marie Richardson Harris is believed to be the first African American woman to hold national office for a major labor union. She later spearheaded Washington, D.C.’s National Negro Congress and was jailed for four-and-a-half years during the McCarthy era.

Civil Rights and Black Liberation After 1955

Contradictions in the cause: Glen Echo, Maryland 1960 [June 26, 2015 by Daniel Hardin]: A behind the scenes look at the internal conflicts within the storied movement to desegregate the Glen Echo Amusement Park.

Raging civil rights struggle leads to union victories: Cambridge Md. 1963 [May 31, 2015 by Daniel Hardin]: The fierce civil rights struggle that involved armed fighting by blacks and whites and a three-year occupation by the Maryland National Guard leads to unity among workers.

Crazy Dion Diamond: A 1960 Rights Warrior in the Suburbs [January 20, 2013 by the editor]: A brief summary of the activities of one of the civil rights activists in Washington, D.C. in the early 1960s. It is followed by an excerpt from Kwame Ture about an incident in a southern jail with Dion Diamond.

Standing against the Maryland Klan 1971: a personal experience [January 2, 2013 by Bob Simpson, cross-posted in the Daily Kos]: A view of the Maryland Klan and one individual’s decision to confront the group at a Klan picnic and cross burning in Rising Sun, Maryland.

The Black Panther Party Revolutionary People’s Convention: November 1970 [November 25, 2012 by the editor]: The turning point in the Black Panther Party’s influence is told through illustrations of the event.

Communists

Paddy Whalen and the Midnight March of the Baltimore Brigade [February 4 2015 by Daniel Hardin]: The port of Baltimore’s leader of the seamen, Paddy Whalen, exerted a powerful influence on all of Maryland’s and the District of Columbia’s labor and civil rights struggles.

DC police raid 1948 fundraiser by Progressive Party supporters [March 6, 2013 by Craig Simpson]: An account of a relatively minor event at the beginning of the second Red Scare that illustrates the repression that was to come for the next ten years.

Shootings by DC police spark fight against brutality, 1936-41 [April 20, 2013 by Craig Simpson]: An account of an early civil rights struggle in Washington, D.C. that united the African American community from the NAACP to the Communist Party and implemented many of the tactics that are still used today.

Police break up unemployed protest at the White House: 1930 [February 26, 2013 by the editor]: A short account of President Herbert Hoover’s response to a 1930 demonstration by the unemployed sponsored by the Communist Party outside the White House. Hoover would gain notoriety and ultimately be defeated for what the public perceived as his callous attitude toward the social conditions created by the Great Depression.

“Scottsboro Boys” – New tactics and strategy for civil rights [February 19, 2013 by Craig Simpson]: The campaign around the “Scottsboro Boys” – nine African American youths accused of raping two Alabama white women—marked the beginning of the civil rights movement out of the churches and into the streets. This account of activities in Washington, D.C. outlines civil disobedience, marches and petition campaigns involving broad coalitions that saved the lives of the nine young men.

600 black women stand strong: the 1938 crab pickers strike [December 5, 2012 by Craig Simpson]: The amazing struggle of 600 black women led by a communist organizer to improve their conditions and win a union on Maryland’s Jim Crow Eastern Shore. The account is followed by a description of an amazing set of photographs of Crisfield during that time and an account of the communist CIO organizer Michael Howard.

A DC labor and civil rights leader remembered: Marie Richardson [November 19, 2012 by Craig Simpson]: Marie Richardson Harris is believed to be the first African American woman to hold national office for a major labor union. She later spearheaded Washington, D.C.’s National Negro Congress and was jailed for four-and-a-half years during the McCarthy era.

D.C. Area Miscellaneous

DC police raid 1948 fundraiser by Progressive Party supporters [March 6, 2013 by Craig Simpson]: An account of a relatively minor event at the beginning of the second Red Scare that illustrates the repression that was to come for the next ten years.

Cock Rock – The rape of our culture [Originally published October 1972 in the Montgomery Spark by Bob Simpson. Republished February 12, 2013 with additional images]: A view from the left of the debasing of women by male rock music.

Washington Free Press battles suppression: 1969-70 [November 7, 2012 by Craig Simpson] A spunky underground D.C. publication battles authorities to its death, but not before knocking down repressive restrictions on free speech and a free press.

Fight Against Fascism

Standing against the Maryland Klan 1971: a personal experience [January 2, 2013 by Bob Simpson, cross-posted in the Daily Kos]: A view of the Maryland Klan and one individual’s decision to confront the group at a Klan picnic and cross burning in Rising Sun, Maryland.

Immigrant Rights

No posts at this time

 LBGT

MoCo gay teacher fired 1972; justice denied for 40 years [December 20, 2012 by Craig Simpson]: Joe Acanfora, an early gay student activist, is barred from teaching in Montgomery County, Maryland public schools causing a nationwide examination of the issue.

Maryland marriage equality: over 50 years in the making [November 14, 2012 by the editor]: A brief photo history of some of the LGBT liberation struggles in the Washington, D.C. area on the occasion of the passage of Maryland’s marriage equality act.

Labor Movement

Raging civil rights struggle leads to union victories: Cambridge Md. 1963 [May 31, 2015 by Daniel Hardin]: The fierce civil rights struggle that involved armed fighting by blacks and whites and a three-year occupation by the Maryland National Guard leads to unity among workers.

Strike wave at Washington, D.C.’s Capital Transit: 1945 [May 10, 2015 by Daniel Hardin]: In the midst of a struggle over integration and pent-up wage demands following World War II, transit workers in Washington wage a battle to better their conditions and in the process set the stage to transform their union.

Paddy Whalen and the Midnight March of the Baltimore Brigade [February 4 2015 by Daniel Hardin]: The port of Baltimore’s leader of the seamen, Paddy Whalen, exerted a powerful influence on all of Maryland’s and the District of Columbia’s labor and civil rights struggles.

The 1937 Phillips Packinghouse strike – Promise and defeat [September 18, 2014 by Daniel Hardin]: An account of interracial solidarity during a long effort to unionize packinghouse workers on Maryland’s Jim Crow Eastern Shore.

Washington Post strike at the crossroads, December 1975 [December 12, 2012 by Craig Simpson]: An examination of the strengths and weaknesses of Post strike–one of the greatest defeats suffered by labor in the Washington, D.C. area.

600 black women stand strong: the 1938 crab pickers strike [December 5, 2012 by Craig Simpson]: The amazing struggle of 600 black women led by a communist organizer to improve their conditions and win a union on Maryland’s Jim Crow Eastern Shore. The account is followed by a description of an amazing set of photographs of Crisfield during that time and an account of the communist CIO organizer Michael Howard.

A DC labor and civil rights leader remembered: Marie Richardson [November 19, 2012 by Craig Simpson]: Marie Richardson Harris is believed to be the first African American woman to hold national office for a major labor union. She later spearheaded Washington, D.C.’s National Negro Congress and was jailed for four-and-a-half years during the McCarthy era.

Meatcutters strike betrayed: October 24, 1973 [October 24, 2012 by the editor]: A brief description of a Washington, D.C. meat cutters strike in which the national Teamsters Union refused to honor picket lines, dooming the walkout to failure.

For a moment in time….Mineral Pigment strike October 19, 1973 [October 19, 2012 by the editor]: A slide show of one day when worker power held the company at bay (no longer supported in WordPress, but the photos can be seen at our Flickr site.

The fight against Capital Transit’s Jim Crow hiring: 1941-55 [October 14, 2012 by Craig Simpson]: The long struggle to integrate Washington’s Capital Transit Company operator ranks—from World War II to the early years of the modern civil rights movement.

Marijuana

No posts at this time

 Miscellaneous

No posts at this time

National Liberation and Anti-Imperialism

(for Indochina War, see Vietnam War)

No posts at this time

Prison Rights

No posts at this time

Slave Resistance/Revolts/Military Action

Maryland slaves make a bold bid for freedom: July 7-8, 1845 [July 2 2015 by the editor]: An account of upwards of a hundred Maryland slaves that armed themselves and staged a quick time march toward freedom in Pennsylvania.

Socialism

Unbowed and unbroken Debs comes to Washington: 1921 [January 10, 2016 by JW] A brief description of Socialist Eugene Debs Washington, D.C. visit following his release from prison for opposing World War I.

Students

Miami means fight back: 1972 [Originally published in the Montgomery Spark, Vol. 2, No. 1, September 6, 1972 by Bob Simpson. Republished April 26, 2014 with additional photographs}: A first hand account of a group of Maryland radicals dubbed The Route One Brigade that traveled to Miami, Fl. to protest at the 1972 Republican convention.

30 Days in May: U. of Md. 1970 [August, 1970 by the Democratic Radical Union of Maryland. Originally published in The Radical Guide to the University of Maryland, 1970. Republished May 29, 2014 with an introduction and postscript by the editor and added photographs]: A contemporaneous account of the transformation of the sleepy southern campus at the University of Maryland into a hotbed of radicalism that brought the National Guard onto campus to quell protests for three consecutive years

Transit in the D.C. Area

Strike wave at Washington, D.C.’s Capital Transit: 1945 [May 10, 2015 by Daniel Hardin]: In the midst of a struggle over integration and pent-up wage demands following World War II, transit workers in Washington wage a battle to better their conditions and in the process set the stage to transform their union.

The DC women streetcar operators of World War II [March 20, 2013 by Craig Simpson]: In the midst of a World War II shortage of operators and a campaign by African Americans to integrate the operator ranks, the transit company hires women for the first time to pilot the city’s streetcars and buses.

The fight against Capital Transit’s Jim Crow hiring: 1941-55 [October 14, 2012 by Craig Simpson]: The long struggle to integrate Washington’s Capital Transit Company operator ranks—from World War II to the early years of the modern civil rights movement.

U.S. National Domestic Politics and Issues

Native Americans take over the Bureau of Indian Affairs [Originally published November 29, 1972 in the Montgomery Spark by Bob Simpson. Republished March 26, 2013 with added photographs]: An account contemporaneous with events of the Native American Trail of Broken Treaties demonstration and subsequent seizure of the Bureau of Indian Affairs that ended peacefully despite both sides arming themselves during the confrontation.

Unemployed

Police break up unemployed protest at the White House: 1930 [February 26, 2013 by the editor]: A short account of President Herbert Hoover’s response to a 1930 demonstration by the unemployed sponsored by the Communist Party outside the White House. Hoover would gain notoriety and ultimately be defeated for what the public perceived as his callous attitude toward the social conditions created by the Great Depression.

Veterans 

No posts at this time

Vietnam War

Miami means fight back: 1972 [Originally published in the Montgomery Spark, Vol. 2, No. 1, September 6, 1972 by Bob Simpson. Republished April 26, 2014 with additional photographs}: A first hand account of a group of Maryland radicals dubbed The Route One Brigade that traveled to Miami, Fl. to protest at the 1972 Republican convention.

30 Days in May: U. of Md. 1970 [August, 1970 by the Democratic Radical Union of Maryland. Originally published in The Radical Guide to the University of Maryland, 1970. Republished May 29, 2013 with an introduction and postscript by the editor and added photographs]: A contemporaneous account of the transformation of the sleepy southern campus at the University of Maryland into a hotbed of radicalism that brought the National Guard onto campus to quell protests for three consecutive years

The 1969 Nixon Inauguration: horse manure, rocks and a pig [January 9, 2013 by Craig Simpson]: An account of President Richard Nixon’s first Inauguration from the point of view of anti-Vietnam War protesters and how it helped change the movement from protest to confrontation.

Women’s Rights

The DC women streetcar operators of World War II [March 20, 2013 by Craig Simpson]: In the midst of a World War II shortage of operators and a campaign by African Americans to integrate the operator ranks, the transit company hires women for the first time to pilot the city’s streetcars and buses.

Cock Rock – The rape of our culture [Originally published October 1972 in the Montgomery Spark by Bob Simpson. Republished February 12, 2013 with additional images]: A view from the left of the debasing of women by male rock music.

When abortion was legalized: one woman’s experience [Originally published February 1972 in the Montgomery Spark by an anonymous woman. It was republished January 15, 2013]: A woman’s experience with abortion shortly after the procedure was legalized in the District of Columbia followed by her reflections 40 years later.

Washington Area Spark

Washington Area Spark – Flickr photo collection guide [October 4, 2017 by the editor]: A finding aid for photographs and other images on the Washington Area Spark Flickr site]

2000 historic photos of DC activism now online [January 26, 2016 by the editor]: Links to some of the most popular and interesting photo collections on the Washington Area Spark Flickr site]

Vintage Washington Area Spark comes back to life 1971-75 [October 13, 2015 by the editor]: a brief description of the original Washington Area Spark and On The Move newspapers and links to PDFs of the tabloid.

A million and counting… [February 15, 2015 by the editor]: A post highlighting some of the popular an interesting photo sets from Spark’s Flickr collection.

Spark 1st Quarter in Review [April 3, 2013, by the editor]: A recap of posts that were published during the first three months of 2013 with brief descriptions and links.

Spark 4th quarter in review [December 26, 2012 by the editor]: A brief summary of the Washington Area Spark blog posts for the previous three months].

Welcome to Washington Area Spark [October 13, 2012 by the editor]: The opening post that gives a brief description of the blog and its mission.

Oh, you wanted to see our images

They are organized in the following manner:

The most recent images posted going all the way back to our first posted image.

In order of the most recently dated image going all the way back to the oldest dated image

By albums, which are groups of images that are related or of the same event.

Image Albums:

(Updated October 26, 2017)

Anarchism and Syndicalism

Sacco & Vanzetti: 1920-27
D.C. Weather bombings: 1971-75
Big Bill in DC: 1915
(New!) First Red Scare: 1919-25

Antiwar

(See Vietnam War for Indochina conflict)

World Citizen: 1948-49
War against Iraq: 1991
Student Peace Union: 1958-67
Debs in DC: 1921
Antiwar: 1917
Women against war: 1920-80
Jeanette Rankin: 1914-40
Women’s International League: 1915-90
No forced ROTC: 1930-70
Anti-draft protests: 1947-72
Youth Congress: 1934-41
Pre-war peace pickets: 1941
No nukes: 1950-85
(New!) Harrisburg 7: 1971-72

Civil Rights & Black Liberation Struggles before 1955

Safeway Jim Crow: 1935-41
Black postal clerks: 1868-1940
Frederick Douglas: 1818-1895
Cafeteria Local 471
Laundry strike: 1937
Interracial dance: 1929
Adam Clayton Powell in DC: 1940-70
Jim Crow at U.S. Engraving: 1947-50
Crime conference: 1934
Maryland lynch mobs: 1930s
Parents League: 1919
DC’s fighting barber: 1947-54
DC swimming pool integration: 1949-54
DC New Negro Alliance: 1934-43
DC National Negro Congress: 1936-55
Mary McLeod Bethune
Truman at NAACP: 1947
African American GAR: 1900-35
Youth Congress: 1934-41
For fair employment: 1941-50
Abolish poll taxes: 1940-48
Gone with the Wind: 1940
Interracial strike: 1937
Georgia lynching protest: 1946
DC Scottsboro action: 1932-35
Free Willie McGee: 1945-51
Bilbo has got to go: 1945-46
Mary Church Terrell: 1863-1954
Martinsville 7: 1951
No police brutality: 1941
No police brutality: 1936-40
No VA Jim Crow?: 1946
DC Jim Crow Theaters: 1922-54
Anti-lynching campaign: 1922
MD crab strike: 1938
Marie Richardson remembered
Fighting Capital Transit racism: 1941-55

Civil Rights & Black Liberation Struggles after 1955

King in DC: 1956-65
VA school segregation: 1957
Youth march: 1959
DC civil rights: 1966
Adam Clayton Powell in DC: 1940-70
Malcolm in DC: 1961-63
NoVa theater Jim Crow: 1962-63
Goodman, Schwerner, Chaney: 1964
Wallace in MD: 1964-72
MD school segregation: 1954-74
Rats cause riots: 1967
Poor People’s march: 1968
20th Anniversary march: 1983
Giles-Johnson: 1961-67
King holiday: 1968-86
DC civil rights: 1962-64
Bowie State: 1968
UMD Black Student Union: 1968-75
Stadium pickets: 1963-90
Terrence Johnson: 1979-80
March on Washington: 1963
Laurence G. Henry: 1960-61
March on DC: 1958
Cambridge, MD rights: 1963-67
DC Selma reaction: 1965
Prayer Pilgrimage: 1957
Demand open housing: 1963-66
MD civil rights: 1960-68
MLK assassinated: 1968
Glen Echo picket: 1960
Rockville, MD sit-in: 1960
Homes not roads: 1969
100 hour Hiser picket: 1960
DC rights warrior: 1960
Resistance to the Klan in MD:
African Liberation: 1972-86
DC Black Panthers: 1969-74
VA restaurant sit-ins: 1960
Racism at the Library of Congress: 1971-73
Children’s march for survival: 1972

Communists

Laundry strike: 1937
Cafeteria Local 471
Federal workers school
Interracial Dance: 1929
Communist Assn.: 1944
Anti-Deng protests: 1979
May Day: 1935
MD crab strike: 1938
Seamen march on DC: 1937
Md.-D.C. communists: 1920-65
Release John Porter: 1928
Bicentennial protests: 1976
Hunger Marches: 1931-32
Immigration rights: 1930
Rosenberg execution: 1953
Celanese strike: 1936
Passaic strike: 1926
Madalyn Murray O’Hair: 1963
DC unemployed protest: 1930
DC Red Scares
Marie Richardson remembered
Sammie Abbott appreciation
DC Scottsboro action: 1932-35
No police brutality: 1936-40
Police raid Progressives: 1948
Spanish Civil War: 1936-39
(New!) First Red Scare: 1919-25

D.C. Area Miscellaneous 

CCNV: 1973-1990
D.C. voting rights: 1932-64
Group Health: 1959
Hit and Stay: 1968-75
Homes not roads: 1969
Police raid Progressives: 1948
Sammie Abbott appreciation
Free Press battle: 1969
Surveying police surveyors: 1971-73

Fight Against Fascism

Spanish Civil War: 1936-39
Wallace in MD: 1964-72
Responding to the right: 1940-85
Liberation of Dachau: 1945
Off to fight fascism: 1942-45
Anti-fascist protests: 1930s
Resistance to the Klan in MD:

Immigrant Rights

Sacco & Vanzetti: 1920-27
Anti-deportation: 1940
Immigrant rights: 1977
Mt. Pleasant riot: 1991
Immigration rights: 1930
Meeting at Central Presbyterian: 1973

LBGT

LBGT rights: 1975-90
DC LGBT rights: 1965-74
MoCo gay teacher fired: 1972-73

Labor Movement

Safeway Jim Crow: 1935-41
Black postal clerks: 1868-1940
Government union: 1934
Patco strike: 1981
Laundry strike: 1937
Cafeteria Local 471
Federal workers school: 1937
Big Bill in DC: 1915
Price controls: 1946
Navy Yard wage cuts: 1921
Jim Crow at US Engraving: 1947-50
Tom Mooney in DC: 1939
Release John Porter: 1928
John L. Lewis in DC: 1935-69
Postal employees: 1934
Terrence Powderly: 1849-1924
Group Health: 1959
Debs in DC: 1921
Hotel workers: 1930-49
Celanese strike: 1936
DC truck strike: 1940 ca.
Transit strike: 1955
Transit strike: 1951
Samuel Gompers: 1850-1924
Passaic strike: 1926
Solidarity Day: 1981-82
Stadium pickets: 1963-90
D.C. Labor meetings
Government workers: 1928
Communications workers: 1940-80
ATU 689 birth: 1916-17
D.C. area strike wave: 1945-46
Capital Transit strikes: 1945
Mother Jones 1837-1930
Taft-Hartley protests: 1947
Seamen march on DC: 1937
WPA protests: 1936-40
Interracial strike: 1937
DC streetcar women: 1943-61
MoCo teachers strike: 1968
MD crab strike: 1938
Marie Richardson remembered
Fighting Capital Transit racism: 1941-55
Post busts pressmen’s union: 1975
Post printers lockout: 1973
K. Graham burned in effigy: 1976
DC Metro wildcats strikes: 1978
Farmworkers Safeway boycott: 1973
Transit strike: 1974
Confrontation at Mineral Pigment: 1973
On the job murder at Metro: 1974
Racism at the Library of Congress: 1971-73
Terps at issue in hotel fight: 1974
Union fight at Lanham hotel: 1974
Hotel workers hit GOP: 1974
Say no to Rhodesian chrome: 1973
Caucus pickets steel talks: 1977
Farah boycott: 1973
May Day picket: 1974
Teamsters strike Safeway: 1974
Meatcutters strike betrayed: 1973
Retail clerks lose strike: 1974
ATU Local 689: No Service 1974
Union staff strike NEA union: 1974
People’s Drug strike: 1974
Fairfax Hotel strike: 1974
(new!) Painters strike: 1937
(new!) Longshore battle: 1951-54
(new!) Wartime strikes: 1942-45
(new!) First Red Scare: 1919-25

Marijuana

Honor America Day: 1970
Yippie smoke-in: 1973
Legalize pot: 1979

Miscellaneous

Revolutionary culture
Random radicals
Statement flags: 1930-75

National Liberation & Anti-Imperialism

(For Indochina War, see Vietnam War)

GW Sino Soviet: 1969
DC Area SDS: 1963-69
War against Iraq: 1991
Spanish Civil War: 1936-39
NSA-CIA to NLF: 1967-71
Palestine protest: 1971
Puerto Rican nationalists: 1950-54
Irish republicans: 1919-21
No to imperialism: 1920-90
African liberation: 1972-86
Free 12 Iranian artists: 1973
Say no to Rhodesian chrome: 1973
CIA out of Greece: 1974
Down with the Shah: 1974
Keep out of Mideast war: 1973
Antiwar: 1917

Prison Rights

Rebellion against system: DC jail 1972
DC Women’s Detention Center: 1973
Tear the walls down: 1973
DC jail uprising trial: 1974

Slave Resistance/Revolts/Military Action

Escape from slavery: 1853-58
Frederick Douglas: 1818-1895
Fight for freedom: 1861-65
MD slave revolt: 1845
African American GAR: 1930-35
(New) Christiana Riot: 1851

Socialism

Debs in D.C.: 1921
People’s Party: 1972

Students

Catholic U strike: 1967
Youth Congress: 1934-41
Anti-deportation: 1940
NSA-CIA to NLF: 1967-71
DC area SDS: 1963-69
No forced ROTC: 1930-70
GW Sino Soviet: 1969
Bowie State: 1968
UMD Black Student Union: 1968-75
Howard U protests: 1967
U of MD ignites: 1970
Cutbacks and layoffs must stop at the U. of MD: 1973
ROTC off campus: U of MD 1971
U of MD antiwar protests: 1972
Terps at issue in hotel fight: 1974
MoCo teachers strike: 1968
Rennie Davis at Montgomery College: 1973

Transit in the DC Area

Group Health: 1959
Exact bus fare: 1968
D.C. streetcar women: 1943-60
Transit strike: 1974
ATU 689 birth: 1916-17
On the job murder at Metro: 1974
ATU Local 689: No Service 1974
Fighting Capital Transit racism: 1941-55
Transit strike: 1955
Transit strike: 1951
Capital Transit strikes; 1945
DC Metro wildcat strikes: 1978

U.S. National Domestic Politics & Issues

Farmers’ protest: 1977-85
No social security cuts: 1981
Earth Day: 1970
Price controls: 1946
Townsend pension plan: 1936
Bicentennial protests: 1976
Chippewas protest on the Mall: 1970
Throw the Bum Out: 1973-74
Wanted: William E Colby 1973
Madalyn Murray O’Hair: 1963
BIA takeover: 1972

Unemployed

Mr. Zero in DC: 1921-32
Hunger marches: 1931-32
Bonus Army: 1932-34
Coxey’s army: 1894-44
Jobless: 1949
Youth Congress: 1934-41
D.C. unemployed protest: 1930
WPA protests: 1936-40
Unemployed League: 1934
Workers Alliance: 1935-40
Cutbacks and layoffs must stop at the U of MD: 1973
No cuts in jobless benefits: 1975-77

Veterans

Bonus Army: 1932-34
Dewey Canyon III: 1971
African American GAR: 1930-35
Vets march on the White House: 1974
Servicemen demand bonus: 1973
VA target of vets picket: 1974
Vets hit military court: 1974
Demanding justice at Justice: 1974

Vietnam War

Protest Viet partition: 1954
DC area SDS: 1963-69
Antiwar: 1967
DC antiwar: 1971
DC national antiwar rally: 1970
NSA-CIA to NLF: 1967-71
Dewey Canyon III: 1971
Chicago 8/7 conspiracy: 1968-70
DC Weather bombings: 1971-75
DC Anti-Vietnam War: 1968
DC Anti-Vietnam War: 1966
Hit and stay: 1968-75
Largest Anti-Viet War protest: 1971
Moratorium: Oct. 1969
Anti-draft protests: 1947-72
Howard U protests: 1967
Moratorium: Nov. 1969
Mayday: May 5, 1971
Honor America Day: 1970
DC anti-Vietnam War: 1965
Mayday: May 4, 1971
Mayday: May 3, 1971
Mayday: May 2, 1971
Mayday: May 1, 1971
March on Pentagon: 1967
Republican convention: 1972
Rennie Davis at Montgomery College: 1973
U of MD ignites: 1970
Counter-Inaugural: 1969
Inauguration protest: 1973
ROTC off campus: U of MD 1971
DC Anti-Vietnam War: 1972
U of MD antiwar protests: 1972
Final march: Vietnam War 1975
March on the Pentagon: 1972
Wanted: William E. Colby: 1973
(New!) Harrisburg 7: 1971-72

Women’s Rights

Abortion rights: 1989
Green Guards: 1940
Women’s vote: 1910-20
Women against war: 1920-80
Jeanette Rankin: 1914-40
Women’s International League 1915-90
Universal childcare: 1971
DC streetcar women: 1943-60
Women’s rights: 1970
DC Abortion: 1972
Ratify the ERA: 1976
MD crab strike: 1938
Marie Richardson remembered

Washington Area Spark Historical

Washington Area Spark
Spark and On The Move mastheads
Photographers of Spark & On the Move
Images published in Spark
Images published in On The Move
Spark and On The Move in action: 1973-74
Spark and On The Move trivia
Two children at Spark house: 1972
Mike Quatro concert: 1972

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